John WARD

Male 1630 - 1717


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name  John WARD 
    Born  1630  Shotley, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • There is no documentation that shows who John's father is. I have just placed him in Edward's family because Edward did live in Muggleswick and would be the right age to be John's father.
    Gender  Male 
    Died  16 Aug 1717  Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Headstone reads: “Here lies the body of John Ward, minister of the Gospel who rested from his labours, the 15th day of August, A.D. 1717, in ye 87th year of his age”.

      He who lies underneath this stone,
      To many once was Deare,
      But now his Soul to Heaven gone,
      God’s praises to sing there.

      Here lies the body of Elinor Ward wife of John Ward who departed this life June/29/1724. Followed by verse.
    Buried  Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I6633  Ward Tree
    Last Modified  15 Apr 2017 

    Father  Edward WARD,   b. Abt 1610, Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1690, Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Ann UNKNOWN,   b. Abt 1610, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Sep 1658, Marske by Richmond, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F2171  Group Sheet

    Family  Elinor UNKNOWN,   d. 29 Jun 1724, Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Abt 1650  Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Enoch WARD,   b. Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Feb 1687, Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Cuthbert WARD,   b. 5 Jun 1664, Gainford, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jul 1747, Muggleswick, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Isaac WARD,   b. Abt 1675, Shotley, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Elizabeth WARD,   b. 1678, Shotley, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. Hannah WARD,   b. Abt 1680, Shotley, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Family ID  F2395  Group Sheet

  • Histories
    John Ward of Muggleswick
    John Ward of Muggleswick

  • Notes 
    • The following is taken from "History of the Baptist Churches in the North of England, from 1648 to 1845"
      By David DOUGLAS (Baptist Minister.)

      The church at Hexham, after the resignation of Mr. Tillam, divided into two sections—the one on the Tyne, and the other on the Derwent. _Two elders had been ordained by Mr. Tillam—the one, Mr. Richard Ord, who had, henceforward, the charge of that portion of the church in Hexham and the vicinity of the Tyne; and Mr. John Ward, who had the charge now, and for a
      long period afterward, of the disciples on “the Derwentwater Side.”
      With regard to Mr. Ward, he seems to have been a native of Muggleswick, the village where Mr. Tillam was so successful in shewing to many the error of infant baptism. The name of Ward seems to have been indigenous here, as it has been known since the seventh century. We are unacquainted with the immediate parentage of Mr. Ward, but we are told by tradition,
      that he was “a skilfull mineralogist." As a man of capacity, he was, probably, employed as an agent in the lead mines, in the neighbourhood of Muggleswick. He appears to have been brought under the influence of
      religion by Mr. Tillam, and baptized 16th October, 1652, in the twenty-Second year of his age, being born in 1630.
      In 1655, Mr. Ward was elected an elder of the church on the Derwent. He was, at this time, only in his twenty-fifth year, but he had qualifications adapted to the important work, as is evident from his success and perseverance, during the long course of sixty-two years. The exercise of Mr. Ward’s ministry, even in the time of Mr. Tillam, would, it is probable, be chiefly confined to the friends around the Derwent; it was permanently so afterwards, while at the same time he co-operated with the-section of the church on the banks of the Wear.
      Mr. Ward, along with the brethren of where he resided, at the commencement of the controversy between Mr. Tillam and Mr. Gower, had warmly taken the part of his own minister, but so soon as the church in Coleman-street had withdrawn from him, he and his brethren appear to have done so likewise. The result. was, the friends at Hexham withdrew from them, as they had thus, in a day of trial, deserted their best friend—their spiritual Father. For several months there was therefore no communication between them.
      A reconciliation, however, was then attempted at Eadsbridge, near Muggleswick, but at this meeting they could not agree. The friends at Hexham then held a conference with the church at Newcastle. At this meeting, it was decided that messengers should be deputed, to meet the Hexham and Derwent brethren, and endeavour to reconcile them. This meeting proved successful. It is said to have been “held at brother Joplin’s, 226. July, 1656.“ The deputation, after mutual explanations, declared the conflicting parties to be one body in the Lord. The ringleader, however, of the schism—Mr. S. Anderton, was expelled.
      From the period of the above conference, little is noted regarding the affairs of either section of the church. None appear to have been added during the
      three following years, but in the end of 1658, one of the members was expelled for marrying an unbeliever, and two were reproved for “going to one of the world’s drinkings after a wedding." In the early part of the
      year 1660, Mr. Anderton was restored, “to the great joy of the church;"

      "Mr. Ward built a house for himself, near the banks of the Derwent, a little south of Muggleswick, which still remains, and is in the possession of the descendants of his brother, Cuthbert Ward, also baptized by Mr. Tillam, and a minister of the same church. From all the writer can ascertain, Mr. Ward himself left no issue, but descendants from the family of his brother Cuthbert, and perhaps two others named Michael and Anthony, are connected, under different names, with several
      Baptist churches, to the present day. Messrs. George and John White, of Barnard Castle, &c., with many others, have descended from this family."

      As to Messrs. Ward and Carr, there is reason to believe that they were both, in some degree, classical scholars. The former on his decease, gave, not only his hundred pounds to the support of the cause, but his library for the benefit of his successors in the ministry. Of this, we have a list in the archives of the church, containing not only books in theology, but of history, and the learned languages. In Latin, we have Figurae Grammaticae, Corderius, Ovid and Horace, a Bible and Testament, Institutio Logica, De Sacramentum, &c.; also a French Grammar, In Greek, a Grammar, a Clavis Linguae, and a New Testament. In Hebrew, there is the Critica Sacra, Thesaurus Biblicus, &c. In church and general history, Eusebius, Josephus, &c., Cromwell’s Life, Eikon Basiliké, Bennet’s Reformation, &c.; and in theology and scriptural exposition, Dr. Owen on the Hebrews, and on the person of Christ; Caryl on Job; and some of the works of Crisp, and Goodwin, and Baxter, and
      Bunyan, Flavel, Usher, &c. The amount, in all, was above hundred and eighty. Surely these men, could not be said to be ignorant, if they closely studied their Bibles, with the help of all these. They
      were men who did not love ignorance; as one of their books was entitled, “The Excellency of Learning.” Their library was one that far excelled Bunyan's, when, in Bedford goal, he wrote his immortal Pilgrim. IN THE NORTH of ENGLAND. 139
      ---------
      An extract from an article in Baptist Magazine and Literary Review, vol.12, written in 1820:
      "BAPTIST CHURCH, At Hawkshead-Hill, Lancashire.

      Formed, June 15,1678. Then present, 1. Mr. Robert Blenkinship, minister at Great Broughton, Cumberland. 2. Mr. John Ward, teaching elder of the church meeting at Hexham, Cold Rowley, and Hamsterley. It is supposed that he was the successor of Mr. Tillam, who had been sent in 1651, by the church in Coleman-street, under the care of Hansard Knollys, to preach the gospel in the north, and who laboured with great success in the vicinity of Hexham. Mr. Ward, being a skilful mineralogist, was employed by a mining company as their steward. He visited the copper- mines in Lancashire once in eight weeks, and then preached m the neighbourhood of Hawkshead-hill, Conistone, and Tarvor."