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Ward Surname History

All of the following information comes from Elizabeth Ramagos who spent 60 years researching Wards. No source was given.

"The Ancient History of the Distinguished Surname Ward: The chronicles of England, though sometimes shrouded by the mists of time, reveal the early records of the name Ward as a Norman surname which ranks as one of the oldest. ... the first record of the name Ward was found in Northampton, where they had been seated from ancient times, and the first on record was Osbert de Varde of Givendale in the year 1130, who was a descendant of Fouques de Vardes of Normandy. His descendent Simon Ward was Governor of Pontefract Castle in 1324. Many alternative spellings of the name were found. They were typically linked to a common root, usually one of the Norman nobles at the Battle of Hastings. ... The family name Ward, is believed to be descended originally from the Norman race. They were commonly believed to be of French origin but were more accurately, of Viking origin, The Vikings landed in the Orkneys and Northern Scotland about the year 870 AD, under their Chief, Stirgud the Stout. Later under their Jarl, Thorfinn Rollo, they invaded France about 940 AD, The French King, Charles the Simple, after Rollo laid siege to Paris, finally conceded defeat and granted northern France to Rollo. Rollo became the first Duke of Normandy, the territory of the North Men. Duke William who invaded and defeated England in 1066, was descended from the first Duke Rollo of Normandy. Duke William took a census of most of England in 1086, and recorded it in the Domesday Book. A family name capable of being traced back to his document, or to Hastings, was a signal honour for most families during the middle ages, and even to this day. The surname Ward emerged as a notable English family name in the county of Northampton. This great Northampton family branched into Yorkshire by the 15th century, and by the 16th century had moved into Norfolk, Oxfordshire, and Warwickshire. They were elevated to the peerage as Barons Dudley and the Viscounts Bangor, and reassumed the title of Baron Ward, which had become extinct with Simon in 1324. They Northwood (sp???) Park, St. Peter?s in Phanet, Calverley, Willie, and Ogborne St. Andrew. The titles of the Earls of Dudley are still held. Of note amongst the family at this time was Baron Simon Ward....
During the War of Independence some declared their loyalty to the crown and moved northward into Canada and became know as the United Empire Loyalists."



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